In the classroom

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The goal of the conversation is to enable the students to reflect on situations where exclusion and discrimination play a role in their own lives. What role did they take? What was the effect of their own contributions? Would they handle this differently now?

Fair Play in the Classroom

In school you can use Fair Play as a part of your lessons, for example in Civic Education or Physical Education (P.E). The best way to address prejudices and discrimination among students is to ask the questions after they have played the game. At the end of the page you’ll find a few exemplary questions.

The goal of the conversation is to enable the students to reflect on situations where exclusion and discrimination play a role in their own lives. What role did they take? What was the effect of their own contributions? Would they handle this differently now?

Making choices

There are four moments during the game where the players need to indicate who should be captain. At the start of the game this choice is made on the basis of their first impression. During the game the players get to know more about their team mates and they can change their preference on the basis of what happens and how the characters respond.

At the end of the game the players are confronted with the choices that they previously made. The other characters are interviewed and through their testimonials the player of the game discovers how their choices have impacted those characters. Do certain things happen more often? How did that feel? What could the players have done differently?

Tips for the classroom

You can use these questions to start the conversation

On the basis of the result screen, you can discuss Fair Play with your class. Below you’ll find a few example questions:

  • What did you think of the game? Why?
  • Why did you become captain and is that similar to what happens on the pitch?
  • What roles did you see during the game?
  • What role is taken by most people?
  • Which groups were discrminated against, according to you?
  • What did you recognise in the game?
  • What do you hope Fair Play will achieve?

Questions to discuss in pairs, with word web (10 minutes)

  • Have you ever experienced something that reminds you of the game?
  • Have you ever stepped in for someone and what happened then?
  • Have you ever been excluded yourself and what happened then?
  • What do you think of the fact that we are discussing this subject right now?
  • What can you do to accept each other more?
  • Conclude the conversation by asking if the students want to share something about their word web.

Tips

  • Don’t judge students, but listen to their motives.
  • Show empathy and sympathy for students, specifically when you have the conversation with the whole class.
  • Try to create support for the prevention of discrimination.
  • Let the students know that it is good to help.
  • Also point at the risk of helping. They don’t necessarily need to intervene on their own.

Provide options such as addressing the problem someone else or alerting the police.


Share your experiences with us

We are curious to know what your experiences were using this game in the classroom. How did the students respond to the game? What struck you about using the game? Did you see a change in their awareness and attitude?

Mail us and let us know.

Fair Play Educational game

Educational game about discrimination which confronts young people with their own choices.

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